i have an f1 goldendoodle whos mother (golden retriever) was fairly small, about 50 lbs, father was a huge standard poodle who was easily 80+ lbs and 26"+ at the shoulder. she was 55 lbs at 26 weeks, but lost about a pound over two weeks and is still 55 at 7 months when she should be 57-58 based on her previous weight gained every week. i dont know if that will affect her adult weight. here is a picture of her on a standard single-person couch :)

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  • The formula for estimating the adult weight is to double the weight at 4 months (17 weeks) and then add 5-10 lbs for Standard doodles. So, what did she weigh at 4 months? 
    Growth and weight gain slow down considerably as a puppy gets older. They don't gain the same amount of weight in their 7th month as they did in their third or fourth month. I would not worry about that. Weight can also be affected by time of day and water consumption, so it may fluctuate. I wouldn't worry about it and I wouldn't weigh her every single week. It isn't necessary. Once a month would be more than enough. 
    Assuming that overall health is good, her weight is going to be what's it's going to be. The growth rate slowing down is normal, it isn't going to affect her adult weight. 
    Although 26" is very tall, Poodles are fine boned dogs, and generally weigh much less than their appearance indicates. An 80+ lb Poodle would be an abomination, lol. I'd guess the sire weighs less than that, at least I hope he does. 
    Your doodle is going to be a big dog. Exactly how big, nobody can tell you for sure, but it doesn't really matter. :) Aside from providing proper nutrition and veterinary care, there's nothing you can do to change how big she may eventually be. That's genetics. 
    She's a pretty dog, enjoy her. 

    • My 27" poodle only weighs 55# at nearly 12 months.  Guess on weight...he was 54# a month or so ago. 
      So I imagine an 80 lb poodle would be 29" tall.  HUUUUUGE!
      Rosco (half poodle and half lab) was 95# and 27.5# 

      • Yes, but Rosco was half Lab. Labs have much bigger, stockier builds than Poodles. I've seen 80 lbs Labs who were only about 22" tall. Jackdoodle was only about 25" and he weighed 85 lbs much of his adult life. 
        80+ lbs for a Poodle would be absurd, I don't care how tall it is. I'd do a genetic test on any Poodle that weight who wasn't grossly overweight. 

    • Riley is 27" and 73 lbs.  She is pretty well muscled, her body is more Bernese-like but on a more poodle-shaped tall "frame" (she is pretty much square from the side).

      Toby who is mostly poodle is about 20" and 32-35 lbs (our scale broke, I don't know lol).  I think he might be only a few inches shy of Riley fully grown but will come nowhere near her weight, I imagine he will be 45-50 lbs.  Looking at him fully grown he might be almost as "big" as Riley but will be nowhere near as heavy.

      A 27" tall 80+ lb poodle makes no sense to me :p  That would mean a poodle heavier than Riley at the same height and she carries a lot of muscle from her Bernese side.

      • Exactly. BMDs are draft dogs. Heavy boned and heavily muscled.

        • If I try to get another draft dog/mix in the future please slap me lol.  As much as I love Riley she is SO STRONG it's completely ridiculous.

          • You should hitch her up to a little cart and charge the neighborhood kids for rides. :D

            • I've been really tempted to hook her up to the wagon when my 2 kids are in there... pushing 85 lbs of combined weight to tow lol.  She'd probably have no trouble doing it.  She is an unreliable horsey though and spooks sometimes :p 

              • It would make a cute Christmas card though. ;)

                • It would be pretty adorable!  Pulling carts is in her blood I'm sure she would be a pro!  Maybe if I have her on the halti on leash but also attach her to the cart using her harness for the car... hmm.... :p 

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