This is a group for all those with Puppies under 2 years old. I thought it would be a good time to get to know one another, share fun moments together, as well as the tough training moments. We puppy parents must unite! If your pups under 2, JOIN!

 

OFFICIAL PUPPY MADNESS DISCUSSIONS

 

Welcome and introductions:  come on and say HI! We love photos!

Popular and important threads for new puppy owners:

Tips for New Doodle Owners - Great starting place for new doodle owners.

How do I stop my puppy from Mouthing/Biting/Nipping? (this thread has a link to at least six older discussions about mouthing, etc. -- replying to this discussion can help centralize all the good feedback about this very common subject. I have just added some of the newer discussions to help update the topic)

What do I do if I have "Pick of the Litter"?- (or how to pick a doodle!)

 

FeedingYourDoodlePuppyFinal.png?width=545

2574 Members

Official Puppy Madness Discussions

Welcome and introductions:  come on and say HI! We love photos!

Popular and important threads for new puppy owners:

Tips for New Doodle Owners - Great starting place for new doodle owners.

How do I stop my puppy from Mouthing/Biting/Nipping? (this thread has a link to at least six older discussions about mouthing, etc. -- replying to this discussion can help centralize all the good feedback about this very common subject. I have just added some of the newer discussions to help update the topic)

What do I do if I have "Pick of the Litter"?- (or how to pick a doodle!)

 

You need to be a member of Doodle Kisses to add comments!

Join Doodle Kisses

Comments

  • We got a new doodle baby a few weeks ago. He has a very wavy/curly body head and ears but his face is more slick and has a long snout like a poodle. We wanted the fluffy doodly look like most people but he doesn’t currently look like he’s going to get furnishings at 10 weeks. Anyone have a doodle who ended up finally getting facial hair?
    • I looked closely at your picture of the pup and it looks like he has an "open face" like a lab--that can happen with any doodle and the breeder should have advised you of that...but the hair can fill in quite a bit and you will see a lot of changes--looks like the pup is very cute though!!
  • In my experience it usually takes a great deal of patience and many many many hours of practice to get a dog who consistently does not pull on a leash.

    The natural reaction for humans, dogs, and horses is to pull back if there is a pull on something they are attached to.

    For me, first I practice endlessly in boring places, in a hallway in the house, . I do this a mimimum of twice a day working from 2 minutes to 15 minutes.  Start with puppy in position beside your leftl leg.  Hold leash so that there is no pull, but very little slack, when this happens -treat. One step forward, if puppy is beside you and leash is slack then treat.  Repeat work up to two steps,three steps, etc between treats.  When you can go the whole length of the hallway with him at your side move outside to a boring place like the same piece of the sidewalk over and over.  Inside could take two weeks, outside longer.  You can use his breakfast and dinner to do this. Generally the word associated with this is heel.  You may use any word like close, side, etc as long as you are consistent.

    There will be NO WALKS anywhere until this phase of training is complete. Then increase outside walks in same place until leash is always slack and so on.  If you really stick to this increasing the walks will go quickly.

    Meahwhile, give puppy exercise with fetch or hide and seek or chase.  Learning to walk properly is extremely important, will wear him out by using his brain and will make all the walks in future years a pleasure.

      The idea is that the leash nevers gets taut and if it does there is no reward just stop and wait for him to work out what needs to happen for a treat. Do not pull puppy back to you - unpleasant for both of you and bad for puppy's neck, not to mention your arm.  If you have all his breakfast he will work it out soon enough.  If he pulls, you stop and he comes toward you, you may lead him with a treat in your hand to his proper position beside you.  This is where a trainer is invaluable.  Much easier to help you in person than trying to figure out my written directions.  Good Luck

    Tigger is 11 and walks reliably on a leash with only the occasional reminder.  Murphy is 18 months and walks well on a leash, but I always have treats to take her right back to training mode as new or rarely encountered events occur.  Training is always a work in progress!!

    I can't stress enough, how helpful I have found it to work with a good trainer.  You must have gotten a mediocre one.  Please try again.

  • There are collars and harnesses that help with pulling. 

  • We have already finished a little school with him, but I do not think we've taken a lot from there. I know that I have to doing a lot myself, but about his pulling it does not go well. What kind of suggestion?

  • He is a good and friendly guy. For now, the only problem is that he constantly pulling and I can not deter it from this. 

  •  

    Good dog parents make for dogs with good character!  Spend lots of time with him, read about dog training, find a good class to go to with him and practice, practice, practice.  Enjoy!

  • Thank you. We will see how he will look like an adult. Above all, it is important that he will be a good character.
     3367123681?profile=original

  • Congratulations!  Such a nice looking doodle.  Welcome.

  • Thank you.

This reply was deleted.